Asian Art Activity: Palampore

Inspired by a 19th-century Palampore, or bed covering, from SAM’s Asian art collection, teaching artist Amina Quraishi leads an art activity focused on shapes, patterns, and symmetry. With just a pencil, eraser, tracing paper, and a sheet of construction paper—and a few other optional art materials—Amina offers a tutorial on pattern building and repetition. Drawing from childhood memories of traveling to India and henna patterns applied to her hands in celebration of Eid al-Fitr, Amina encourages artists to think about meaningful objects and symbols in their culture. How can these be incorporated into the work?

Take a closer look at this Palampore and compare it to a contemporary work by artist Faig Ahmed by watching SAM’s Asian Art Spotlight: Oiling & Palampore video. And, find more educational videos of works on view at the Seattle Asian Art Museum in our Eyes on Asia Youtube playlist.

The Seattle Asian Art Museum is open, though school tours are not available at this time. SAM continues to connect art lovers of all ages to our rich collection of art through a variety of virtual experiences which align with Washington State learning standards in Visual Art and English Language Arts. The Eyes on Asia video series is designed to be used as a supplemental learning tool in virtual classrooms, at home by parents and caregivers, and by friends hanging out online. Once you’ve watched the videos in the playlist, visit the museum to see the featured artworks in person!

Photo: Amina Quraishi

Asian Art Spotlight: Oiling & Palampore

How do traditions evolve over time? Consider this question as you compare a historical example of a Palampore with Faig Ahmed’s Oiling, both on view at the Seattle Asian Art Museum. Look closely at the intricate patterns, the symmetry (or lack thereof), and the ways in which order and disorder are portrayed in each artwork. What can you learn about the contemporary piece, Oiling, by looking closely at the Palampore?

This video brings together historical and contemporary works of art to show how traditions and modernity interact in our world today. A quick drawing activity offers a way of remotely engaging with the artworks and provides the foundation for a more in-depth art activity inspired by the Palampore in our Eyes on Asia YouTube playlist

The Seattle Asian Art Museum is open again though school tours are not available at this time. Aligned with Washington State learning standards in Visual Art and English Language Arts, the Eyes of Asia video series is meant to connect art lovers of all ages to the museum’s rich collection of art through a variety of virtual experiences and provide opportunity for creative response. Each video can be used in virtual classrooms, at home by parents and caregivers, or by friends hanging out online. Visit the museum in person to see these, and other artworks featured in the series!

Asian Art Activity: Family Tree

Follow along with teaching artist Carina del Rosario to create your own artwork inspired by Zhang Huan’s Family Tree currently on view in Be/longing: Contemporary Asian Art at the Seattle Asian Art Museum. Utilizing Zhang’s themes of identity and fate, del Rosario emphasizes a reflective approach to creating a self portrait by examining the ways we see our present selves as well as the ways other people view us. Rather than accepting these perceptions and expectations, she challenges us to use this activity as an opportunity to create a vision for who we want to become.

Whether on your own or in a group, this art-making activity encourages thoughtful creativity for artists of all ages and in any setting. Learn more about Family Tree by watching an in-depth informational video as part of SAM’s Eyes on Asia YouTube playlist.

The Seattle Asian Art Museum is open again though school tours are still not available at this time. The Eyes on Asia video series is intended to enhance virtual classrooms, home learning for parents and caregivers, and entertain friends hanging out online! All videos are aligned with Washington State learning standards in Visual Art and English Language Arts. We encourage you to visit the museum in person to see the artworks featured in the series!

Photo: Carina del Rosario

Asian Art Spotlight: Family Tree

How do words, images, and identity come together in art? To answer this questions, take a close look at Family Tree by Zhang Huan currently on view in Be/longing: Contemporary Asian Art at the Seattle Asian Art Museum. Zoom in and notice the details, consider the work as a whole, or think about the other artworks on view in the exhibition and how they also relate to ideas of identity.

This video offers in-depth information on the artist and artwork to be used on your own or in a group, on site at the museum or remotely on your computer. Either way, questions throughout the video will prompt reflection on themes from the artwork and exhibition such as how place influences how we are perceived. Combine this video with an art making activity inspired by Family Tree that can be found in the Eyes on Asia Youtube playlist.

The Seattle Asian Art Museum is open again though school tours are not available at this time. We are working to connect art lovers of all ages to this rich collection of art through a variety of virtual experiences. In this series of videos we explore art from across the world’s largest continent that focus on diverse art objects and provide opportunity for creative response. Each video can be used in virtual classrooms, at home by parents and caregivers, and by friends hanging out online! These videos are aligned with Washington State learning standards in Visual Art and English Language Arts. We hope you will visit the museum and see this and other artworks featured in the Eyes on Asia series when you can!

Photo: Robert Wade
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